Making Interactive Maps With jQuery

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Making Interactive Maps With jQuery

By Chrissie Brodigan
I use both Flash and jQuery when designing interactions for data visualization projects. A great opportunity came along to experiment with ways jQuery could be used to develop an interactive map. Before I go further, I admit that mistakes were made, but no pandas were harmed at any point and our team learned a lot, […]


I use both Flash and jQuery when designing interactions for data visualization projects. A great opportunity came along to experiment with ways jQuery could be used to develop an interactive map. Before I go further, I admit that mistakes were made, but no pandas were harmed at any point and our team learned a lot, so it ended up a win-win (for us and the pandas).

The project we started out with was simple, we had a comp and a request to create a flash map that could display some static data. After diving in a little deeper, it became clear that the data source would change on a regular basis, so I recommended that we try to create a small ecosystem with various pieces of the project:

  • spreadsheet (our data source)
  • CMS (client was using WordPress)
  • map of the U.S. (caveat: each U.S. location needed to be able to be displayed in 1 of 3 colors: red, yellow, green for the animation, and ultimately managed as an .SVG)

jQuery as a Substitute for Flash?

We could have accomplished everything with Flash, but we wanted to learn something new and today’s browsers (shame-free plug for Chrome!) speed up DOM manipulations, so Flash isn’t the only or best choice, and there were clear benefits:

  • Easy—jQuery is already packaged into WordPress
  • Styling—design can be easily restyled by almost any team member
  • Integrated—everything lives integrated within the page v. living in layers
  • UX first—end users never need to install a plugin
  • Recession proof—we didn’t have to buy another Adobe product

Other Things we Kept in Mind

Smart architecture: All of the data is stored in a simple spreadsheet. jQuery, CSS, and simple variable placement determined by a PHP script takes the data and displays it both properly and in multiple places (click over to teachingjobsportal.com to see it in action).

Developer-free updates: The little ecosystem we created allowed us to use one data source to update both the map and each of the locations’ corresponding pages (51 pages for 50 states & DC) that are stored in WordPress. This keeps things simple, reduces the chance for user error, saves a ton of time because a user doesn’t have to open all the individual files, and doesn’t require involving a developer.

SEO-friendly: jQuery allowed us to represent all of the data in HTML, so Google and other search engines can gobble it up and help us make it more discoverable.

Joel Sutherland: Joel Sutherland of New Media Campaigns wrote an awesome post on building an interactive map with jQuery over Flash in January 2009, and he made me believe we could do it too (albeit on a far simpler scale).

Like I Said, Mistakes Were Made

We got too fancy

At a point while we were executing, we decided to convert the data export from the CSV into XML (this also converted the .SVG and made it dynamic). While XML was easier to work with on the developer-side, it added steps and complexities to the process

Additionally, the map’s point-by-point coordinates, complex outlines (U.S. states are not nicely designed with 90 degree angles), and dynamic states required that we use software to both build the map and manage the images in an alternate library, enter ImageMagick. Simple enough, but the problem using ImageMagick to manage the library of the various U.S. state colors we also introduced “Imagick” a truly nasty PHP extension into the mix, which caused a new set of issues.

We descended into dependency hell

Installing PHP extensions can be tough, and Imagick is a huge pain in the a$$. During installation, it requires that you be prepared to manage a large set of spaghetti-like dependencies. There’s also a small bug that we ran into, which prevented compiling, so our Debian-friendly team found ourselves in Unix-land attempting to execute YUM (which usually solves the problem of “dependency hell”), and ultimately lost the battle and had to compile ImageMagick manually (both annoying and a time-suck).

We created simple, but stubborn architecture

Our little ecosystem (the one I’ve touted as mostly simple) is quiet stubborn and set in her ways. We can make updates to the data anytime, but because we didn’t build the data source as a database, we cannot easily add new fields without having to update everything.

We overlooked Hawaii & Alaska

I threw this one in for fun, but whoa! Big oversight! We accidentally forgot to include HI and Alaska and essentially redesigned the U.S. without them.

So, to Wrap it all Up

jQuery was a great substitute to Flash for us, making TeachingJobsPortal’s map. Furthermore, the execution was mostly simple, our client can control the map and its related pages’ content without having to hire a developer. (*I also didn’t have to learn Flash on the fly)

Though our animation designs are ongoing, we’ve created a new and much nicer hover state, we really like the way that the gauge works (it’s connected to the image library and as the states change color it automatically updates as well), and, as planned, the map smoothly changes colors when the data source is updated.

We’re considering ways we can eliminate using ImageMagick for the library, because we want to use the map on another project and lighten up the load on the CMS, so I’d love your thoughts on that as well as any other ideas you have on jQuery v. Flash!

I owe a lot to Joel Sutherland for sharing his team’s work, so we could learn from it, and for releasing a fantastic jQuery plug-in that I encourage you to use if you ever create zoomable interactive maps.

*Production by my brilliant partners at jjomedia.com

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